Quick Tips for Sports Vision

To do well in sports, you need to have your eyes working at the top of their game. Here are a few quick tips to help you or your athlete perform better:

  • Make sure you have a proper prescription on, whether it is contact lenses or glasses. Having your vision dialed in correctly is the most important step to get your eyes working their best.
  • Be sure to protect your eyes! Polycarbonate or other protective plastic lenses can keep your eyes protected while you play as well as keeping dust or wind from getting in your eyes while you play the sports you love. This table can help you determine which types of eye protection are best for the sport you play. (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/eyewear.htm )

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

  • Consider color filters for your field of play. Certain types of filters or tints can increase your contrast sensitivity and thereby increase your reaction times. Allaboutvision.com has an excellent table for different tints to help in different sports (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/lens-tints-chart.htm ). Remember, the faster you can recognize that curve ball, the easier it will be to adjust your swing!

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

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Getting children ready to go back to school

Summer seems to have just started, but the new school year is only a month away. Many of us get ready for this time by making sure our kids have the right clothes, books and school supplies to start the year off right, but we forget to make sure that our kid’s eyes are working well so that learning in school is easy, comfortable, and fun!

The back to school season is a great time to schedule your child’s eye health and vision exam. Optometrists are able to make sure that not only is your child seeing as clear  as possible, but that all of their other visual skills are working properly to handle the demands of the new school year.

"Reading is Fun" Photo Courtesy of John-Morgan on Flickr

“Reading is Fun” Photo Courtesy of John-Morgan on Flickr

The following are some of the important visual skills necessary for learning in the classroom:

  • Visual acuity — The ability to see clearly at any distance. Seeing 20/20 is only one portion of all of the visual skills necessary for classroom success, but sometimes the only area that is assessed by typical “vision screenings.”
  • Eye Tracking — The ability to follow with the eyes a slow moving object such as the teacher moving around the front of the classroom and the ability for the eyes to follow along a line of print while reading without skipping or re-reading
  • Focusing Flexibility- the eyes ability to maintain focus on objects in the distance and at near as well as shift focus quickly from point to point.
  • Eye teaming — The skill needed to aim both eyes together at the same time.  This is a needed skill for lining the eyes up while reading across of page of print and also to have the very high level of depth perception needed for sports.
  • Eye-hand coordination — The skill needed to coordinate the visual system and the motor system when writing, copying, or playing sports.
  • Visual perception — The skill needed to sort, understand and remember information that is coming into the visual system.

Making sure all of these areas are working at the highest level will help ensure that your child has a successful school year.

~By Lisa Weiss, OD, FAAO

The Low Down on Pink Eye

Just your luck, it’s Friday afternoon and you find that you or your loved one has a pink eye, it may be a little irritated or painful, and you are worried because the weekend is coming up.  Your optometrist’s office may be closing soon.  Should you call your optometrist, go to urgent care, or risk the weekend without seeing an eye doctor?

Photo Courtesy of Lone Primate on Flickr.com

Photo Courtesy of Lone Primate on Flickr.com

Pink eye is a term used to describe an irritated pink or red eye.  The medical term is conjunctivitis which is an inflammation of the thin tissue overlying the whites of the eyes.  However, there are a variety of eye conditions that can cause an eye to become pink or irritated, although conjunctivitis is the most common cause.  Conjunctivitis can often be categorized into 3 different categories:

Bacterial conjunctivitis – This form is caused by bacteria and can be transferred in a variety of ways ranging from airborne to direct contact on one’s fingertips.  Bacterial conjunctivitis can cause sticky, yellowish green discharge, occasionally resulting in the lids sticking shut in the mornings.  The eye may be pink, painful, and sensitive to light.  Usually only one eye is affected although the other eye can become infected by indirect contact.  It is contagious and is often treated with antibiotic eye drops.  Once you have been treated for 24 hours with antibiotics, you are no longer contagious.

If you are a contact lens wearer, an irritated, painful and pink eye is usually the result of a bacterial infection.  This needs to be treated right away because you may develop a corneal ulcer and risk permanent vision loss.

Viral conjunctivitis – Most instances of viral conjunctivitis will cause the eyes to appear red and glassy, and there may be a watery discharge.  It usually affects both eyes and may be accompanied by an upper respiratory infection.  The lymph nodes in front of the ears and along the neck may be tender and swollen.  These cases are highly contagious and cannot be treated with medication.  They will resolve on their own within 7 to 10 days.  Some may take as long as 3 weeks.  Until then, patients should avoid spreading it to others.  Some may find relief with cool compresses or artificial tears throughout the day.

Occasionally, an eye can become infected by the herpes simplex or herpes zoster virus.  Symptoms may include a pink eye, pain, decrease in vision, or blisters on one side of the face.  These patients need to be seen and treated immediately in order to prevent vision loss.

Allergic conjunctivitis – This form of pink eye is prevalent throughout the year, depending on a person’s allergies and the plants that are in bloom during that season.  Allergic conjunctivitis will typically cause itching, tearing, and sticky, thick and white discharge that affects both eyes.  Some may notice their symptoms are worse after being outdoors.  Many often complain of an itchy throat or runny nose.  Usually, oral allergy medications will alleviate the symptoms related to the eyes, but many require the additional use of topical allergy eye drops to relieve symptoms.

I have seen a number of patients on a Friday afternoon with complaints of a pink eye.  Many times, the symptoms are not severe enough to determine what form of conjunctivitis the patient has, which can make treatment a little trickier.  In those cases, we advise the patient to return for a follow-up visit to determine if the treatment was effective.

A good rule of thumb for whether or not you need to see an optometrist when you have a pink eye is that if you are experiencing pain, light sensitivity, are noticing reduced vision or wear contact lenses, then visit an eye doctor today.  Make sure you do not put on your contact lenses.  I often advise my patients to try seeing an eye doctor first, rather than visiting urgent care as they may not have all the tools required to adequately diagnose your eye condition.

So, keep your hands clean, don’t share towels and avoid touching your face and eyes!

– Cindy P. Wang, OD, FAAO

Anatomy of the Eye 101

Courtesy of DVIDSHUB on Flickr

Courtesy of DVIDSHUB on Flickr

As a teacher and a doctor, I talk about the eye on a daily basis to my optometry students and patients alike.  I often use examples that my optometry students and patients can relate to.  The eye is like a high definition video camera that captures images of the visual world in real time.  If any part of your eye, that is, your “human video camera,” is affected or broken you may experience varying degrees of blurry vision, discomfort, or other common symptoms.  If you seek professional evaluation by your optometrist at the first inkling that something is out of sync, he or she can “fix or repair” your eye and get you back on a healthy track.

So let’s talk about the eye from front to back.

To start, the eyelids and lashes are the first visible structures to the outside observer.  Not only are the eyelids and lashes beautiful, but they also serve to protect the eye.  The eyelids spread lubricating tears like that of a windshield wiper across the surface of the eye with just a single blink, and the lashes act like specialized antennae sensing the smallest incoming offending particles.

Next, the conjunctiva is known to us as the “white” part of the eye.  This too is visible to the outside observer.  There are times that the conjunctiva may get inflamed or infected which results in that unwanted “pink eye” or conjunctivitis.

Much respect and attention has been given to the 5-layer-thick cornea as the clear window of the eye.  This is the layer where contact lenses are applied to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.  Many successful surgeries like LASIK and corneal transplants have been performed on this tissue.

The anterior chamber and the vitreous are two compartments that give form to the eye and serve as conduits for circulating important fluids from one part of the eye to another.

Courtesy of entirelysubjective on Flickr

Courtesy of entirelysubjective on Flickr

The color part of the eye is called the iris.  It comes in many different colors and hues including brown, hazel, green, blue, and even violet.  The purpose of the iris is to regulate the amount of light that enters the eye.  Like that of a camera shutter, the iris controls the size of the pupil thus preventing under or over exposure of the picture of the visual world that is being seen.

The crystalline lens sits right behind the iris.  And similar to a camera lens, the human lens helps focus the things we see.

The retina, optic nerve, and macula can all be found way back in the eye.  The retina is the nervous tissue of the eye and is made up of 10 important layers. It gathers nervous signals and funnels it to the optic nerve.  As the name implies, the optic nerve is the nervous cable that connects the eye to the sight center in the back of the brain.  The macula allows you to see the finest details in vision.

This sums up the crash course on the Anatomy of the Eye 101.  Next time you are at your friendly optometrist’s office, just imagine the different parts of your eye being systematically looked at.

~By Judy Tong, OD

Vision therapy to improve academic & athletic performance

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Vision therapy (VT) is a high effective type of physical and perceptual therapy that works on improving eye muscle control and coordination, eye-hand and eye-body coordination, as well as visual processing/understanding and visual cognitive skills.

Seeing takes place in the brain instead of the eyes. The eyes are the instruments which transmit visual images to the brain. The brain then processes and integrates visual information with other systems such as the vestibular system to affect balance and spatial localization, as well as affecting understanding of what is seen or read. VT uses neuroplasticity to improve visual functioning and the activities that require vision.

When most people think of good vision, they think of seeing clearly– that is, having 20/20 vision. While seeing clearly is important, it is only one aspect of vision.

Having good vision involves much more than seeing 20/20. Being a good reader, a good driver, or a good athlete requires mastering a complex set of vision skills, such as eye tracking, eye teaming, visual perception and visual memory. Unfortunately, many children and adults have problems with these types of visual skills. Although they may see 20/20, they do not have good vision. They may have trouble reading or working on a computer. They may have difficulty driving or excelling in sports.

It is estimated that as many as 20 percent of people may suffer from these types of problems. Please click here to see if you may have a treatable vision problem that is interfering with your work, reading or sports performance.

Vision therapy can treat many problems including:

  • Strabismus
  • Amblyopia
  • Visually-related learning problems
  • Visual Impairment after Brain Injury (such as stroke, craniotomy)
  • Double vision
  • Sports Vision – to enhance athletic performance through faster and more accurate visual motor skills
  • Computer Vision Syndrome (headaches, eyestrain, decreased productivity)

Here are the most frequently asked questions about VT:

1. How do I know that I may need VT?

A: There are many symptoms that indicate a need for VT. Some of the more common symptoms are: eyestrain associated with reading or computer use, not performing to potential at school or work, poor eye-hand coordination with sports or handwriting, double vision, print that appears to “move” on the page, and losing your place while reading.

Special tests will determine if your specific vision problems can be treated with VT.

If you have two or more of the following symptoms, you can benefit from VT. It takes energy to compensate for a vision problem, which results in discomfort and loss of productivity. Improving your visual skills can improve your academic, athletic and executive performance.

  • My eyes feel tired or uncomfortable while reading
  • Headaches while reading or studying
  • Reading or computer use makes me sleepy
  • I, or my child, is not performing to my potential in school or work
  • I have difficulty remembering what I have read
  • Frequent loss of concentration while reading
  • Words move, jump, or appear to “swim”
  • Double vision
  • I am a slow reader
  • “Pulling” sensation around eyes while reading
  • Words blur, or go in and out of focus
  • I often lose my place, or jump over letters & words
  • I often re-read the same line over and over
  • I do not like to read for pleasure
  • I have a short attention span while reading compared to other activities
  • I have poor eye-hand coordination while playing sports
  • I have poor depth perception
  • I learn better visually than verbally
  •  I get dizzy reading in the car
  • I have difficulty judging distances such as parallel parking or stopping a car
  • I have difficulty making visual judgments such as the depth of stairs, pouring coffee into a cup

2. What is involved with vision therapy?

A: A vision therapy program incorporates many different exercises that train deficient visual skills. Learning visual skills is like learning to play the piano, or a new sport. VT exercises are performed in our office under the supervision of a vision therapist. We also prescribe home therapy to reinforce and accelerate the development of newly learned skills.

The length of the VT program depends on the nature and severity of your vision problem.

3. What results can I expect?

A: You can expect your vision to improve significantly or completely if you stick to the program as prescribed by the doctor. The amount of your improvement depends on the type of vision problem(s) you have, how well you follow doctor’s orders and how regularly you practice your vision exercises.

4. Will my insurance cover vision therapy?

A: Few insurance plans cover VT, but it depends on your particular insurance coverage. The California Optometric Association has several doctors who specialize in vision therapy who would be happy to help you determine if you have any allowance for vision therapy.

5. What kind of vision problems can be treated with vision therapy?

VT can treat a variety of vision problems including:

  • Strabismus (eye turn)
  • Amblyopia (lazy eye)
  • Oculomotor dysfunction
  • Focusing problems
  • Double vision
  • Convergence insufficiency or excess

Visually-related learning problems

Visual motor or visual perceptual problems can interfere with the input and processing of visual information. This decreases a student’s performance on reading and writing tasks, which are highly dependent on visual skills (see symptom checklist below).

Visual motor problems can occur in these skills: tracking, eye teaming, or focusing.

Visual perceptual delays can occur in: visual-motor integration, visual memory or sequential memory, visual discrimination, visual figure ground, visual form constancy, or speed of visual processing.

Sports performance enhancement therapy

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Photo courtesy of DeusXFlorida on Flickr.com

VT can be used to improve athletic performance through increasing visual accuracy, speed of visual reaction time, depth perception, tracking speed (to follow a target quickly), increasing the span of recognition, and improving eye-hand and eye-body coordination.

Enhancing Executive Performance

VT can be used to improve work productivity by increasing visual stamina, decreasing symptoms such as eyestrain or headaches associated with desk or computer work, improving speed of scanning and reading.

Visual Rehabilitation after Brain Injury

80 percent of the brain is related to visual function; therefore, after an injury to the brain (such as stroke, craniotomy, aneurysm or trauma) visual skills and activities dependent on visual skills (such as walking and driving) are often impaired. VT can be used to train the non-damaged part of the brain to do what the damaged part used to do.

Symptoms of brain injury-related visual impairment include double vision, poor judgment of distance while driving or reaching for objects, hemianopsia or loss of side vision, frequent loss of place while reading, skipping words, sensitivity to light, vertigo, fluctuating vision, bumping into objects, decreased depth perception, leaning to one side, and eyestrain.

Please refer to the section on Brain Injuries for more information.

6. Can Adults benefit from VT?

A: Vision therapy benefits adults. In fact, Dr. Brisco went through VT as an adult, and it has tremendously contributed to her improved reading speed and comprehension, as well as her tennis game!

Vision problems that were not corrected during childhood often persist through adulthood, thus interfering with efficiency and productivity on visual tasks. The majority of vision problems are treatable at any age, but it is better to catch problems early to maximize your potential during your academic and executive career.

~By Elise Brisco, OD, FCOVD, FAAO