Tint my world – what different sunglass tints do for my vision

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bollwitt on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bollwitt on Flickr

Have you ever been shopping for new sunglasses and been asked, “what color lenses would you like?” If you look back over the past century, there have been many different colors of sunglass lenses that were popular. Back in the 1930’s, Ray-ban developed their B-15 brown lens to be used by US Airforce pilots. Followed up by the G-15 with grey-green sunglass lens, standard in the iconic Wayfarer in the 1950’s. In the 80’s, Vuarnet came out with the popular Px 2000 amber lens to increase contrast and the Px 5000 brown lens for extreme conditions of high mountains, glaciers and desert.

Revo – blue, Suncloud – red, what is the best color for your sunglass lenses?

The following is a guide to the benefits of different lens colors:

  • Grey – most common lens color; this tint is considered neutral because it maintains true colors while decreasing light levels. Good for general outdoor activities.
  • Green –works the same in any light condition; they can be used for just about any outdoor activity.
  • Brown and Amber –causes some color distortion, but also increases contrast. These lenses filter out distortion caused by scattered blue light thus are great for activities like tennis, skiing, boating, high-altitude sports, or other sports where distance vision is important. This tint is also great for golf, as it highlights varying contrasts of green on the golf course.
  • Yellow – like amber lenses, some color distortion, but increased contrast. Great for activities in lower light levels especially with changes from light to shadows. These are the lenses to choose when mountain biking, target shooting, skiing, playing tennis, or piloting an aircraft.
  • Pink, Rose and Red –block blue light, thereby improving contrast. Very soothing to the eyes, they provide good visibility on the road. Great for sports like cycling and racing.
  • Blue and Purple – a high contrast lens that reduces glare from visible white light. These lenses are endorsed by the USPTA for tennis professionals and linepersons in the sport because they block the glare from visible white light.
  • Polarization – though not a tint, polarized lenses offer significant glare reduction. Glare caused by light reflected off flat surfaces including roadways, water and snow is blocked by polarized filters, whereas tints can only decrease light intensity. A polarized lens can be combined with nearly any lens color.

No matter what color lenses you choose, the most important feature of your sunglasses is UV protection. Be sure to ask for 100% UV 400 eye protection to decrease the risk of certain eye diseases including macular degeneration, cataracts, and pterygium. According to the American Optometric Association, to provide adequate protection for your eyes, sunglasses should:

  • block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation;
  • screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light;
  • be perfectly matched in color and free of distortion and imperfection

~ Steven Sage Hider, OD
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

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School is out! How to keep your child’s eyes healthy during summer

Photo courtesy of Andrew Eick on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Andrew Eick on Flickr

A few weeks ago we published a blog about how important it is for our children to spend time outdoors to prevent myopia. ‎

Being outdoors is great for helping to prevent nearsightedness and for exercising our eye focusing muscles, but you may wonder what else you need to do to make sure your child’s eyes stay healthy through the summer.

A few things come to mind.  It has become very common practice to never let our children leave the house with out sun protection: Sunblock, hats, UV blocking clothes and bathing suits. But, what is less common is remembering sunglasses for UV protection for the eyes.  Kids playing outdoors in the sun are exposing the lenses of their eyes and their retinas to harmful UV radiation.  Additionally, their lenses are so young that they do not block UV as well as adult lenses thus sending more UV to the retina.  UV damage to the lens and retina can by a cause of early cataracts and Macular Degeneration.  When buying sunglasses for kids, make sure that they are UV blocking and polarized if possible to reduce glare when around water. More information about children and sunglasses can also be found here.

Next, swim goggles are a good idea for the pool to help keep chlorine out of the eyes.  Chlorine can cause redness, burning, and blurry vision as well.  An added bonus would be swim goggles with a little tint or UV protection as well. If your child experiences these symptoms after playing in the pool, ask your eye doctor what eye drops are right to use to help.

Lastly, the use of sports goggles for eye protection during sports activities is also a must for eye injury prevention while playing soccer, baseball and any other outdoor sports.  For more information about preventing eye injury this summer, here is another great resource.

Enjoy your summer, enjoy the outdoors and the sunshine and stay eye healthy and safe!

~Lisa Weiss, OD, FAAO
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org

http://www.coavision.org

 

 

 

 

Google Glass – friend or foe?

Publication1One of the newest trends in technology is wearables. Some of these devices like the Fitbit help you keep in shape by keeping track of how many steps the wearer takes and how well they sleep. Others like the Samsung Gear 2 allow you to check email, listen to music and do myriad tasks while looking like a normal watch. But, the most interesting wearable for optometrists is Google Glass.

As of a few weeks ago, Google Glass was only available for beta testing through its explorer program which allowed for only an elite group of tech-savvy individuals to purchase it ($1500). However, as of May 15th, anyone can purchase Glass and even obtain prescription eyewear that hosts the Glass computer. As such, some practices, including my own, have signed up to be Glass experts who can work with the approved frames.

So, what does Google Glass do and what makes it interesting to medicine? Well, for starters, Glass can take pictures and record video with voice commands. These applications can be extremely useful for hands free recording of surgical procedures. This can assist in educating health care providers, can serve as a permanent record in case complications arise, and allow for patients and doctors to communicate effectively even if they are not in the same city.

And what about day-to-day activities? Well, while using the recording device may unnerve people due to privacy concerns, I can certainly imagine recording video of my kids or maybe my favorite band at a concert. Glass can also translate words you see, help you with directions, and allow you to look up information. It can even help measure distances on a golf course and track the miles you run.  One detractor, some complain about eye pain after wearing the device for a number of hours.  Google has acknowledged this as a possible side effect of wearing Glass and can be due to unnatural eye movements like looking up for a long period of time.

As you can imagine, myriad applications are being developed to maximize this piece of technology. Also, other companies have developed similar devices. So, what do you think about Google Glass? Do you have privacy concerns? Do you think that this is a cool trend, or do you think Glass is lame and pretentious? Let’s discuss!

~David Ardaya, OD
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

My eye doctor prescribed spending time outside

We have all heard about how much time kids spend inside watching TV, studying, and playing video games. My seven-year-old son is addicted to rainbow looms, and could loom all day if I let him. New studies have indicated that the amount of time children spend outside may decrease the risk of developing myopia.

What is myopia?

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a vision condition in which close objects are seen clearly but far objects appear blurred. Nearsightedness is a very common vision condition, affecting nearly 30 percent of the US population, and up to 90 percent of developed East and Southeast Asian countries such as Singapore, Taiwan, China, Japan and Korea. Myopia typically presents in school age children. Because the eye continues to grow as children grow, myopia may progress until approximately age 21.

Photo Courtesy of Shirley Binn

Photo Courtesy of Shirley Binn

Recent studies have indicated that more time spent on near work, less time spent outdoors, higher educational level and parental history of nearsightedness are risk factors for developing nearsightedness. Spending time outdoors plays a crucial role in myopia development and can slow its progression.

A recent study presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) 2014 Annual Meeting demonstrated the importance of time spent outdoors in order to control nearsightedness. The study evaluated visual acuity (vision) and axial length (length of the eye) of 6690 multiethnic children at 6 years of age. Axial length was significantly longer in children who spent less than one hour per day outdoors than in those who spent more than 2 hours outdoors.
Jan Roelof Polling, at the University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, lead investigator of the study recommended “Children with an increased risk of near-sightedness, such as those from a near-sighted family, should be prompted to spend at least 15 hours a week outside and should avoid spending long hours doing near work, even when they are very young.”

Photo Courtesy of RavEytan

Photo Courtesy of RavEytan

How does spending time outdoors help with myopia progression?

The protective effect of being outdoors is not well understood. Researchers suspect that bright outdoor light helps children’s developing eyes maintain the correct distance between the lens and the retina, keeping vision in focus. The intensity and / or specific spectral distribution of outdoor lighting may be beneficial. Indoor lighting that is dim does not provide the same kind of feedback. Therefore, when children spend too many hours inside, their eyes fail to grow correctly and the distance between the lens and retina becomes too long, causing far-away objects to look blurry. Hormonal changes associated with outdoor activities may also be beneficial.

Encouraging children to spend more time outdoors can be a simple and cost-effective way to improve their vision and general health. Head outside and enjoy the summer! Just remember to keep spending time outside when school resumes.

Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

California Optometric Association

Sunglasses- not just a style choice, but a vision-saving device

Photo courtesy of Steven Depolo on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Steven Depolo on Flickr

Not just a style choice

What do you think of when you see someone in sunglasses? Among the most common responses I hear from my patients when I ask them about sunglasses is “fashion.” And while your Michael Kors sunglasses can be an excellent fashion accessory, they can also be a tool well suited to add to your arsenal of eye protection.

Sunglasses are protection

The next question I hear when discussing sunglasses with my patients is “protection from what?” Sunglasses can help provide protection from damaging UV rays of the sun, serve as a barrier for ocular allergens to help reduce allergic conjunctivitis in patients who have eye allergies, and protect the surface of your eyes if you are a patient with tear film insufficiency or dry eyes.

Watch out for UV rays

Damaging Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun can cause indirect DNA damage and contribute to skin cancer. It can also cause changes to the health and structure of your eyes. UV ray exposure has unfortunately been linked with a higher incidence of macular degeneration, certain forms of cataracts, and pterygiums (those fleshy growths on the white of the eye that can grow to cover your pupil).

UV radiation from the sun comes in three forms- A, B and C. UV C is the most mutagenic, which means it is the most damaging of the three. Fortunately, our planet’s ozone layer absorbs most of this type of radiation so that it never makes it down to us. UV B is the form of radiation from the sun that causes sunburns, and sunscreens that are labelled with SPF numbers describe how well they block UV B. UV A unfortunately also damages the DNA in your skin and eyes. New full-spectrum sunscreens and sunblocks can help protect your skin from both UV A and UV B radiation. Similar to a full-spectrum sunblock, sunglasses with UV A and UV B protection can help prevent your eyes from exposure to 99.9% of UV A and UV B rays. 

Allergy protection

For patients who suffer from seasonal allergies, especially contact lens wearers, wearing a large pair of sunglasses can be an ideal barrier for potential ocular allergens. Whether they are sport sunglasses or the larger fashion sunglasses, having larger lenses and a bit of face wrap, or curves to fit the front of your face, allow sunglasses to block a lot of the pollens, dust and spores that can trigger eye allergies.

Similarly, for patients who suffer from tear film insufficiency or dry eye, having a large barrier in front of the eyes to protect from the elements encountered outdoors can make treatment and management of this eye disease much easier. 

Sunglasses are always going to be seen as a fashion accessory, but try not to forget how beneficial they can be for eye protection. And remember – there is nothing wrong with looking good while taking care of your eyes! 

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD, FAAO
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

Eye Injury- It’s more common than you think

Courtesy of Geoffrey Fairchild on Flickr

Courtesy of Geoffrey Fairchild on Flickr

Injuries can happen to anyone at any time. You can scratch your cornea with your fingernail or have a fractured eye socket from being hit by a baseball. Some are more drastic, but they are all more common than you think.

The most common eye injuries include:

1.  Scratches to the cornea (Corneal Abrasion). This can result from something like a fingernail in the eye or even from a foreign object such as dirt or sand.  Abrasions can also happen if something falls into the eye during home improvement projects or working out in the garage. Symptoms of a corneal abrasion include tearing, pain, the sensation that something is in the eye and often extreme light sensitivity. If you suspect you have scratched your cornea, call your optometrist immediately.  Scratched corneas are more prone to infection and depending on where the scratch is located, can cause scarring and loss of vision if not treated urgently.

2. Chemical Burns from household items. Many household cleaners can burn the eyes if the product splashes in the eye. These burns can range from mild to severe depending on the product used. Alkali burns from cleaners can be less painful but more damaging than acid burns. Symptoms  of both burns include redness, pain and swelling. If something splashes in your eye, rinse it under copious amounts of water for 15 minutes and call your eye doctor or visit urgent care. You will want to let the doctor know what the substance was that got in the eye. This will help your eye doctor with the appropriate treatment.

3.  Penetrating eye injury. Metallic objects and things such as fishhooks can certainly cause severe damage to the eye structures.  This is a potentially very dangerous situation. A metallic object can lodge itself in the cornea and cause a great amount of scarring if not removed.  Do not attempt to remove the item yourself. Call your eye doctor and go to urgent care.

4.  Orbital Fractures. This can happen if a moving object hits the eye at a high speed. For example, a baseball, a bat, a fist, or similar trauma.  This type of injury can be very serious and involve the eye as well as the surrounding bones and tissues.  This is an emergency and should be treated urgently.

Eye injuries can happen anytime and anywhere.  We can use some common sense precautions to help limit damage to the eye and surrounding structures.  As much as possible, use safety glasses or goggles when working with chemicals or any items that may cause a scratch or penetration to the eye. Sports safety goggles are a good choice for both children and adults to help prevent injuries while participating in sports.

A little protection will go along way in preventing eye injuries.

Stay safe!

~Lisa Weiss, OD, MEd, FCOVD
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

Can eye color affect your vision?

 

Courtesy of Felix Leupold on Flickr

Courtesy of Felix Leupold on Flickr

During my 20+ years of providing clinical care, my patients have asked me a variety of questions regarding their eyes. One of the inquiries that has come up recently is, “I heard that having different eye colors can affect your vision…is that true?”

Well, there certainly has been much written about, debated over, and researched on this very topic. We know that the iris is what gives a person their eye color. There are numerous eye colors and variations thereof. They span from the lightest of blue, to green, to a mixture of hazel, to the darkest of brown, and even violet like that of the late Elizabeth Taylor. Most of us would agree that some of us are more attracted to one eye color over another, so maybe having a particular eye color confers some advantages.

From a vision clarity standpoint, people with varying shades of blue eyes to brown eyes can see equally well. With that said, there are some plusses and minuses in possessing a particular eye color. What is known from an “evidence based” perspective is that individuals with light eyes (blue) tend to be more light sensitive. I often impart this analogy to my patients. If we think of the colored iris as a window covering, more light will be allowed to come through a window to light up a room with a light blue curtain as compared to an opaque brown one. So much the same occurs with a light colored iris. They just have less pigment to block out or reflect back the light. In fact, this may be one of the reasons why an individual with light eyes may be more at risk for developing macular degeneration. Recommendation have been made for patients with light eyes to wear UV protective eyewear, UV coated contact lenses, or even opaque colored contact lenses.

It is also a little known fact that dark eye colors (brown) can withstand high glare situations better than light eyes. Dark eyes have the ability to absorb more light and allow less light to get reflect. My patients with dark eyes are not as bothered by driving at night in the midst of annoying glare from headlights of other cars.

So to circle back to the question, “I heard that having different eye colors can affect your vision…is that true?”

It can be answered with a “YES,” but honestly, the difference is so ever subtle.

~ Judy Tong OD, FAAO
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org