Tint my world – what different sunglass tints do for my vision

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bollwitt on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Rebecca Bollwitt on Flickr

Have you ever been shopping for new sunglasses and been asked, “what color lenses would you like?” If you look back over the past century, there have been many different colors of sunglass lenses that were popular. Back in the 1930’s, Ray-ban developed their B-15 brown lens to be used by US Airforce pilots. Followed up by the G-15 with grey-green sunglass lens, standard in the iconic Wayfarer in the 1950’s. In the 80’s, Vuarnet came out with the popular Px 2000 amber lens to increase contrast and the Px 5000 brown lens for extreme conditions of high mountains, glaciers and desert.

Revo – blue, Suncloud – red, what is the best color for your sunglass lenses?

The following is a guide to the benefits of different lens colors:

  • Grey – most common lens color; this tint is considered neutral because it maintains true colors while decreasing light levels. Good for general outdoor activities.
  • Green –works the same in any light condition; they can be used for just about any outdoor activity.
  • Brown and Amber –causes some color distortion, but also increases contrast. These lenses filter out distortion caused by scattered blue light thus are great for activities like tennis, skiing, boating, high-altitude sports, or other sports where distance vision is important. This tint is also great for golf, as it highlights varying contrasts of green on the golf course.
  • Yellow – like amber lenses, some color distortion, but increased contrast. Great for activities in lower light levels especially with changes from light to shadows. These are the lenses to choose when mountain biking, target shooting, skiing, playing tennis, or piloting an aircraft.
  • Pink, Rose and Red –block blue light, thereby improving contrast. Very soothing to the eyes, they provide good visibility on the road. Great for sports like cycling and racing.
  • Blue and Purple – a high contrast lens that reduces glare from visible white light. These lenses are endorsed by the USPTA for tennis professionals and linepersons in the sport because they block the glare from visible white light.
  • Polarization – though not a tint, polarized lenses offer significant glare reduction. Glare caused by light reflected off flat surfaces including roadways, water and snow is blocked by polarized filters, whereas tints can only decrease light intensity. A polarized lens can be combined with nearly any lens color.

No matter what color lenses you choose, the most important feature of your sunglasses is UV protection. Be sure to ask for 100% UV 400 eye protection to decrease the risk of certain eye diseases including macular degeneration, cataracts, and pterygium. According to the American Optometric Association, to provide adequate protection for your eyes, sunglasses should:

  • block out 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation;
  • screen out 75 to 90 percent of visible light;
  • be perfectly matched in color and free of distortion and imperfection

~ Steven Sage Hider, OD
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

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Traumatic Brain injury: A rising concern in youth sports

Photo courtesy of K8tilyn on Flickr

Photo courtesy of K8tilyn on Flickr

Spring is almost here, and soon spring sports such as soccer, baseball and softball are going to be in full swing for our kids.

And while we encourage participation in outdoor activities and sports, it is good to be aware of the possible injuries and what to look out for.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, emergency department visits for sports related traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussions have increased by 60% for children and teens in the last ten years. The most common activities that can cause injury are bicycling, football, playground, basketball and soccer.  With this increase, there is also an increased awareness of safety in sports and signs and symptoms related to a TBI that can occur during play. This allows for steps to be taken to improve safety and reduce risk for our kids.

A TBI can occur if a person receives a blow to the head or a jolt to the body the causes quick head movement.  Some signs and symptoms of TBI include:

  • confusion
  • dizziness
  • memory and concentration loss
  • clumsy movement
  • change in mood, behavior, or personality
  • double or blurry vision
  • light and noise sensitivity

Once and injury like this has occurred, symptoms can last up to months and it is important to not go back to sports too quickly as the brain needs time to heal.

Optometrist’s role in treatment

Photo Courtesy of Fitness Hospital on Flickr

Photo Courtesy of Fitness Hospital on Flickr

Optometrists can play a large roll in the healing process from a TBI.

Because the brain nerves related to vision go everywhere in the brain, almost all TBI patients have some effect to their vision system and visual function in some way.  Issues such as memory and concentration loss, dizziness, double and blurry vision and light sensitivity can affect more than just sports performance. These problems can also affect academic performance even in a child who was succeeding academically prior to the injury.  Neurorehabilitative Optometry can address these problems and help improve brain and visual function though the use of specialized vision therapy techniques, specialized glasses and prisms.

If you suspect that a lingering brain injury is affecting your child’s academic performance, an evaluation by a California Optometric Association optometrist can help determine what can be done to help and refer you the appropriate optometrist specialist that can assess and treat the visual problems associated with the head injury.

Play Hard and Be Safe!

~Lisa M. Weiss, OD, FCOVD
California Optometric Association
http://www.eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

CDC resources for parents and coaches on TBI and concussions can be found here.

Winter eye care – How can I protect my eyes during winter?

Photo credit: adwriter from Flickr

Photo credit: adwriter from Flickr

Got dry eyes?

We are now in the heart of winter, which means I have seen a number of patients come in with complaints associated with the season.  A common complaint? Dry eyes.  With cold weather comes increased use of heating systems both in our houses and cars. While the  warm air certainly feels great, the heat and decreased humidity dry your skin and eyes.  This is particularly true for my contact lens patients. An easy way to stay comfortable is to keep artificial tears handy and to point vents away from your face.  Also, a humidifier can come in very handy for both your eyes and other sensitive tissues like the inside of your nose.

Playing in the snow?

Photo credit: LaRimdaME from Flickr

Photo credit: LaRimdaME from Flickr

I also had a couple patients tell me they were going on a winter sports trip in the mountains. While playing in the snow is definitely fun, it can be unhealthy for your eyes.  Ultraviolet light is even more powerful when reflected off of snow and with increased altitude.  Too much exposure to ultraviolet light can cause a condition called photokeratitis.  Unfortunately, I had a mild case of this after building a snow fort as a child.  While the fort turned out great, my eyes did not.  My eyes stung and my vision was blurry for about a day.  Some people suffer much worse, so it is very important to use UV-protecting sun glasses when hitting the slopes.

Interestingly, a new coating for your glasses has been invented that eliminates fogging.  So, if you find yourself going from hot to cold environments quickly for work or play, or eating a hot bowl of soup on a cold day, you may want to ask your doctor about this new technology. As you can see with a few simple steps, your eyes can be healthier and better protected in winter. So get out there, stay protected and have a great time!

~David C. Ardaya, OD
California Optometric Association
http://www.coavision.oeg

Are contact lenses dangerous?

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

The Benefits

Contact lenses are medical devices that millions of people wear safely every single day. Many people enjoy the freedom from glasses that contact lenses allow.

Contact lenses are also great options for:

  • Sports
  • Changing eye color
  • People who have irregularities to the front of the eye, cornea, or are not able to see with glasses.

Contact lenses make it possible to see and function in everyday life.

The Dangers

Contact lenses can be dangerous if they are abused.

Contact lenses are medical devices and can only be prescribed and dispensed by a licensed eye doctor. If they are sold without being evaluated on the eye by a doctor it can lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Eye inflammation
  • Eye injuries

Proper care is key

Proper contact lens care and handling are important components of the contact lens fitting process. Contact lens solution used incorrectly or “topping off contact lens solution” (adding more without disposing of the current solution) can lead to multiple complications. It is important to use sterile contact lens solution and not tap water due to bacteria in water. Never, ever put contact lenses in your mouth or spit on them to try to clean them.

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

It is also important to replace contact lenses at the recommended frequency. For example, daily disposable contact lenses should be replaced each day. Contact lenses that are overused and abused can lead to serious problems.

Certain contact lenses are approved for sleeping or extended wear. However, if your contact lenses are not approved for extended wear, this can lead to complications on the cornea, or front of the eye.

If you are interested in contact lenses, schedule an appointment with a doctor of optometry today.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

Should I get contact lenses? Quick guide to help you decide!

Prescription contact lenses can provide the freedom and comfort to perform a number of activities that cannot be achieved in glasses.

  • The most common example is sports. For those instances where you know you will be running or jumping for extended amount of time and hopefully breaking a sweat at the same time, contact lenses are an ideal choice for vision correction. No need to worry about your frames slipping off your nose or blocking your peripheral vision. Contacts can provide you with crisp and clear vision throughout your entire visual field so you can focus on being your best.
Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

  • Another great example is for social events or gatherings where you know there will be cameras everywhere. This can range from brides-to-be prepping for their big day to just spending a night out with friends. When you know you want to look your best in the photos commemorating important times in the lives of your family and friends, contact lenses are the best accessory you could ask for!
  • Similarly, prescription color contact lenses can give you that extra pizzazz when you want to be a little different. Whether you are just adding a little blue or green to match your outfit or a purple or gray tint to draw some extra attention to your face, prescription color contacts can be a great choice to help you stand out in a crowd.
  • I personally choose to wear my prescription contact lenses on days when it is raining or cold. That way I can avoid having rain drops on my glasses or having my lenses fog up for 30 seconds or more when I go indoors in the winter time.
Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

  • The best thing about contact lenses is the new technology used in the current manufacturing processes of prescription contact lenses. This allows your optometrist the ability to fit nearly any prescription you can imagine in materials that are approximately 10 times better than what we used only a few years ago! Today’s prescription contact lenses are available in aspheric designs to help you see more clearly and with UV blocking filters to help protect your eyes throughout the day.

If you think contact lenses may work for you, call your optometrist today to schedule a contact lenses fitting.

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

Quick Tips for Sports Vision

To do well in sports, you need to have your eyes working at the top of their game. Here are a few quick tips to help you or your athlete perform better:

  • Make sure you have a proper prescription on, whether it is contact lenses or glasses. Having your vision dialed in correctly is the most important step to get your eyes working their best.
  • Be sure to protect your eyes! Polycarbonate or other protective plastic lenses can keep your eyes protected while you play as well as keeping dust or wind from getting in your eyes while you play the sports you love. This table can help you determine which types of eye protection are best for the sport you play. (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/eyewear.htm )

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

  • Consider color filters for your field of play. Certain types of filters or tints can increase your contrast sensitivity and thereby increase your reaction times. Allaboutvision.com has an excellent table for different tints to help in different sports (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/lens-tints-chart.htm ). Remember, the faster you can recognize that curve ball, the easier it will be to adjust your swing!

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

Getting children ready to go back to school

Summer seems to have just started, but the new school year is only a month away. Many of us get ready for this time by making sure our kids have the right clothes, books and school supplies to start the year off right, but we forget to make sure that our kid’s eyes are working well so that learning in school is easy, comfortable, and fun!

The back to school season is a great time to schedule your child’s eye health and vision exam. Optometrists are able to make sure that not only is your child seeing as clear  as possible, but that all of their other visual skills are working properly to handle the demands of the new school year.

"Reading is Fun" Photo Courtesy of John-Morgan on Flickr

“Reading is Fun” Photo Courtesy of John-Morgan on Flickr

The following are some of the important visual skills necessary for learning in the classroom:

  • Visual acuity — The ability to see clearly at any distance. Seeing 20/20 is only one portion of all of the visual skills necessary for classroom success, but sometimes the only area that is assessed by typical “vision screenings.”
  • Eye Tracking — The ability to follow with the eyes a slow moving object such as the teacher moving around the front of the classroom and the ability for the eyes to follow along a line of print while reading without skipping or re-reading
  • Focusing Flexibility- the eyes ability to maintain focus on objects in the distance and at near as well as shift focus quickly from point to point.
  • Eye teaming — The skill needed to aim both eyes together at the same time.  This is a needed skill for lining the eyes up while reading across of page of print and also to have the very high level of depth perception needed for sports.
  • Eye-hand coordination — The skill needed to coordinate the visual system and the motor system when writing, copying, or playing sports.
  • Visual perception — The skill needed to sort, understand and remember information that is coming into the visual system.

Making sure all of these areas are working at the highest level will help ensure that your child has a successful school year.

~By Lisa Weiss, OD, FAAO