School is out! How to keep your child’s eyes healthy during summer

Photo courtesy of Andrew Eick on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Andrew Eick on Flickr

A few weeks ago we published a blog about how important it is for our children to spend time outdoors to prevent myopia. ‎

Being outdoors is great for helping to prevent nearsightedness and for exercising our eye focusing muscles, but you may wonder what else you need to do to make sure your child’s eyes stay healthy through the summer.

A few things come to mind.  It has become very common practice to never let our children leave the house with out sun protection: Sunblock, hats, UV blocking clothes and bathing suits. But, what is less common is remembering sunglasses for UV protection for the eyes.  Kids playing outdoors in the sun are exposing the lenses of their eyes and their retinas to harmful UV radiation.  Additionally, their lenses are so young that they do not block UV as well as adult lenses thus sending more UV to the retina.  UV damage to the lens and retina can by a cause of early cataracts and Macular Degeneration.  When buying sunglasses for kids, make sure that they are UV blocking and polarized if possible to reduce glare when around water. More information about children and sunglasses can also be found here.

Next, swim goggles are a good idea for the pool to help keep chlorine out of the eyes.  Chlorine can cause redness, burning, and blurry vision as well.  An added bonus would be swim goggles with a little tint or UV protection as well. If your child experiences these symptoms after playing in the pool, ask your eye doctor what eye drops are right to use to help.

Lastly, the use of sports goggles for eye protection during sports activities is also a must for eye injury prevention while playing soccer, baseball and any other outdoor sports.  For more information about preventing eye injury this summer, here is another great resource.

Enjoy your summer, enjoy the outdoors and the sunshine and stay eye healthy and safe!

~Lisa Weiss, OD, FAAO
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org

http://www.coavision.org

 

 

 

 

Google Glass – friend or foe?

Publication1One of the newest trends in technology is wearables. Some of these devices like the Fitbit help you keep in shape by keeping track of how many steps the wearer takes and how well they sleep. Others like the Samsung Gear 2 allow you to check email, listen to music and do myriad tasks while looking like a normal watch. But, the most interesting wearable for optometrists is Google Glass.

As of a few weeks ago, Google Glass was only available for beta testing through its explorer program which allowed for only an elite group of tech-savvy individuals to purchase it ($1500). However, as of May 15th, anyone can purchase Glass and even obtain prescription eyewear that hosts the Glass computer. As such, some practices, including my own, have signed up to be Glass experts who can work with the approved frames.

So, what does Google Glass do and what makes it interesting to medicine? Well, for starters, Glass can take pictures and record video with voice commands. These applications can be extremely useful for hands free recording of surgical procedures. This can assist in educating health care providers, can serve as a permanent record in case complications arise, and allow for patients and doctors to communicate effectively even if they are not in the same city.

And what about day-to-day activities? Well, while using the recording device may unnerve people due to privacy concerns, I can certainly imagine recording video of my kids or maybe my favorite band at a concert. Glass can also translate words you see, help you with directions, and allow you to look up information. It can even help measure distances on a golf course and track the miles you run.  One detractor, some complain about eye pain after wearing the device for a number of hours.  Google has acknowledged this as a possible side effect of wearing Glass and can be due to unnatural eye movements like looking up for a long period of time.

As you can imagine, myriad applications are being developed to maximize this piece of technology. Also, other companies have developed similar devices. So, what do you think about Google Glass? Do you have privacy concerns? Do you think that this is a cool trend, or do you think Glass is lame and pretentious? Let’s discuss!

~David Ardaya, OD
California Optometric Association
http://eyehelp.org
http://www.coavision.org

The SCARY… and fun truth about colored contact lenses

Colored contact lenses are a popular topic this time of year as many people prepare their Halloween costumes. How fun is it to have a cool accessory like tiger eyes, cat eyes or red or white eyes to complement the most creative of costume? Colored contacts are a great fun option.  There are also many people who like to wear colored contact lenses daily to make their eyes more blue, more green, more brown or a different color all together!

Courtesy of therefromhere on Flickr

Courtesy of therefromhere on Flickr

However, most people do not realize that even contacts worn for cosmetic purposes still pose a potential health risk for the eye if not properly fitted. This is true even if there is no prescription on the lens.  Contact lenses are classified as “medical devices” with the FDA.  Regardless of a corrective prescription, contacts are plastic on the surface of the eye and need to be fit properly and be taken care of properly to lessen the chance of vision threatening infections such as corneal ulcers.

Doctors of optometry perform additional tests above and beyond the glasses and eye health examinations when fitting contacts. We evaluate the size and shape of the cornea, the health of the tear layer and the fitting relationship between the cornea (the outer surface of the eye where the lens sits) and the contacts lens to insure the safest most appropriate lens for each individual patient.  We also educate patients on the best cleaning and wearing regimen for the them.  This greatly reduces any complications associated with contact lens use.

Buying contact lenses without a doctor’s prescription is something that happens with colored contacts often.  This practice leads to rise in vision threatening conditions that could be prevented with a proper contact lens examination. So, buy a different kind Halloween contact lens for each Halloween party this season, but get a prescription first!

~Lisa Weiss, OD, MEd, FCOVDCalifornia Optometric Association
http://www.coavision.org

Night blindness 101

The term night blindness sounds alarming, as though some people are actually blind at night.  There is a small percentage of the population that does in fact experience true night blindness, but it is rare and often the result of late stage eye disease.  In optometry, it is not common to use the term night blindness although we do encounter a significant number of patients who complain of poor night vision.  The symptoms are usually blur and dimming of vision at night, glare and haloes around lights and poor adaptation from light to dark environments.  How do you know if what you are experiencing is normal or a result of something more serious?

There are a handful of eye conditions that can create symptoms of poor night vision.

Photo Courtesy of kenleewrites on Flickr

Photo Courtesy of kenleewrites on Flickr

  1.  Patients who have had surgery to the corneas such as LASIK or corneal transplants may notice glare and haloes around light.  They may also experience diminished contrast sensitivity which can cause images in the evening to appear more dim.  Unfortunately, surgical results usually cannot be reversed.
  2. Cataracts are the number one cause of decreased night vision.  Patients over the age of 40 will begin developing mild cataracts.  This is when the natural lens inside the eye becomes more yellow and opaque as a result of age and ultraviolet exposure.  Cataracts can cause haloes and dimming of vision in the dark and decreased contrast sensitivity.  Fortunately, cataracts are easily removed thereby restoring problems with night vision.
  3. Corneal diseases such as keratoconus and severe dry eyes may also affect one’s vision in the evenings causing double vision or haloes.  For some of these patients, specialty contact lenses or eyedrops will alleviate these symptoms.
  4. Newer technology has also allowed optometrists to detect higher order aberrations in some patients.  For these patients, standard spectacle lenses may not improve night vision problems.  An instrument to detect higher order aberrations will determine whether a patient requires a specialty custom-made spectacle lens to improve night vision.

Some patients do in fact have true night blindness caused by an eye disease in its late stage.  Usually, symptoms begin slowly over time and progress to an inability to see in the dark.  These patients usually suffer from one of two eye conditions.

  1.  Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disease of the retina, the tissue that lines the back wall of the eye and captures visual images.  Retinitis pigmentosa affects the rods of the retina and causes slow deterioration of these structures.  The rods (unlike the cones) are responsible for night vision and for peripheral vision.  As the disease progresses, patients will notice a decrease in their ability to see in the dark and in the periphery.  Unfortunately, there is no current cure for retinitis pigmentosa.
  2. Glaucoma is an eye disease where the optic nerve slowly degenerates.  Patients with glaucoma usually have no symptoms in the early stages of the disease.  As the disease progresses, nerve fibers in the retina begin to deteriorate resulting in a decrease in peripheral vision as well as night vision.  Usually, patients do not experience symptoms of poor night vision and poor peripheral vision until the late stages of the disease.

Now that you know the causes, what are some ways to alleviate or improve poor night vision?  The simplest solution is to wear an updated pair of prescription glasses (if you have a prescription) with higher index lenses and an anti-glare coat.  Your optometrist can also inform you if you require customized lenses to correct for higher-order aberrations.  If your night vision problems are not a result of surgery or any eye diseases that you are aware of, then it is important that you visit your optometrist for a comprehensive eye examination.

– Cindy P. Wang, O.D., F.A.A.O.
California Optometric Association
www.coavision.org

Are contact lenses dangerous?

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

The Benefits

Contact lenses are medical devices that millions of people wear safely every single day. Many people enjoy the freedom from glasses that contact lenses allow.

Contact lenses are also great options for:

  • Sports
  • Changing eye color
  • People who have irregularities to the front of the eye, cornea, or are not able to see with glasses.

Contact lenses make it possible to see and function in everyday life.

The Dangers

Contact lenses can be dangerous if they are abused.

Contact lenses are medical devices and can only be prescribed and dispensed by a licensed eye doctor. If they are sold without being evaluated on the eye by a doctor it can lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Eye inflammation
  • Eye injuries

Proper care is key

Proper contact lens care and handling are important components of the contact lens fitting process. Contact lens solution used incorrectly or “topping off contact lens solution” (adding more without disposing of the current solution) can lead to multiple complications. It is important to use sterile contact lens solution and not tap water due to bacteria in water. Never, ever put contact lenses in your mouth or spit on them to try to clean them.

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

It is also important to replace contact lenses at the recommended frequency. For example, daily disposable contact lenses should be replaced each day. Contact lenses that are overused and abused can lead to serious problems.

Certain contact lenses are approved for sleeping or extended wear. However, if your contact lenses are not approved for extended wear, this can lead to complications on the cornea, or front of the eye.

If you are interested in contact lenses, schedule an appointment with a doctor of optometry today.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

Quick Tips for Sports Vision

To do well in sports, you need to have your eyes working at the top of their game. Here are a few quick tips to help you or your athlete perform better:

  • Make sure you have a proper prescription on, whether it is contact lenses or glasses. Having your vision dialed in correctly is the most important step to get your eyes working their best.
  • Be sure to protect your eyes! Polycarbonate or other protective plastic lenses can keep your eyes protected while you play as well as keeping dust or wind from getting in your eyes while you play the sports you love. This table can help you determine which types of eye protection are best for the sport you play. (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/eyewear.htm )

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

  • Consider color filters for your field of play. Certain types of filters or tints can increase your contrast sensitivity and thereby increase your reaction times. Allaboutvision.com has an excellent table for different tints to help in different sports (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/lens-tints-chart.htm ). Remember, the faster you can recognize that curve ball, the easier it will be to adjust your swing!

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

Summer is coming – protect your eyes while having fun in the sun!

Summer is coming

Most of us understand that we need to protect our skin from UV rays to avoid sunburn and potential sun damage and skin cancer.  But, we often overlook the need to protect our eyes from these harmful UV rays as well.  UV damage can increase your risk of cataract, macular degeneration, pterygium (benign growths on the white part of the eye) and also damage the sensitive skin around the eyes.  The following four tips from the American Optometric Association will help you keep you and your family’s eyes healthy all summer and all year long in the sun.

Here’s what you need to know to protect your eyes:

  1. Wear protective eyewear any time your eyes are exposed to UV light, even on cloudy days and during winter months. Glare from snow on the ground can reflect UV into your eyes.
  2. Sunglasses should block out 99-100% of UVA and UVB radiation and screen out 75-90% of visible light.  Polarized lenses is a good way to do this because they can specifically block out the most prominent light rays while maintaining clear vision.
  3. Grey colored lenses are best. They reduce light sensitivity without altering the color of object and provide the most natural color vision without distortion
  4. Don’t forget your kids! They need sunglasses too as they tend to spend more time outdoors than adults do.

One last tip: Don’t forget about a good quality sunglasses  frame. It should be big enough to protect your eyes and the skin around your eyes from the sun.

Use these tips to keep your eyes safe and healthy through all your outdoor activities.  As always, continue to get routine eye health and vision examinations yearly.

Enjoy the summer!

~Lisa M. Weiss, OD, MEd, FAAO