Are contact lenses dangerous?

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

The Benefits

Contact lenses are medical devices that millions of people wear safely every single day. Many people enjoy the freedom from glasses that contact lenses allow.

Contact lenses are also great options for:

  • Sports
  • Changing eye color
  • People who have irregularities to the front of the eye, cornea, or are not able to see with glasses.

Contact lenses make it possible to see and function in everyday life.

The Dangers

Contact lenses can be dangerous if they are abused.

Contact lenses are medical devices and can only be prescribed and dispensed by a licensed eye doctor. If they are sold without being evaluated on the eye by a doctor it can lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Eye inflammation
  • Eye injuries

Proper care is key

Proper contact lens care and handling are important components of the contact lens fitting process. Contact lens solution used incorrectly or “topping off contact lens solution” (adding more without disposing of the current solution) can lead to multiple complications. It is important to use sterile contact lens solution and not tap water due to bacteria in water. Never, ever put contact lenses in your mouth or spit on them to try to clean them.

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

It is also important to replace contact lenses at the recommended frequency. For example, daily disposable contact lenses should be replaced each day. Contact lenses that are overused and abused can lead to serious problems.

Certain contact lenses are approved for sleeping or extended wear. However, if your contact lenses are not approved for extended wear, this can lead to complications on the cornea, or front of the eye.

If you are interested in contact lenses, schedule an appointment with a doctor of optometry today.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

Should I get contact lenses? Quick guide to help you decide!

Prescription contact lenses can provide the freedom and comfort to perform a number of activities that cannot be achieved in glasses.

  • The most common example is sports. For those instances where you know you will be running or jumping for extended amount of time and hopefully breaking a sweat at the same time, contact lenses are an ideal choice for vision correction. No need to worry about your frames slipping off your nose or blocking your peripheral vision. Contacts can provide you with crisp and clear vision throughout your entire visual field so you can focus on being your best.
Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

  • Another great example is for social events or gatherings where you know there will be cameras everywhere. This can range from brides-to-be prepping for their big day to just spending a night out with friends. When you know you want to look your best in the photos commemorating important times in the lives of your family and friends, contact lenses are the best accessory you could ask for!
  • Similarly, prescription color contact lenses can give you that extra pizzazz when you want to be a little different. Whether you are just adding a little blue or green to match your outfit or a purple or gray tint to draw some extra attention to your face, prescription color contacts can be a great choice to help you stand out in a crowd.
  • I personally choose to wear my prescription contact lenses on days when it is raining or cold. That way I can avoid having rain drops on my glasses or having my lenses fog up for 30 seconds or more when I go indoors in the winter time.
Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

  • The best thing about contact lenses is the new technology used in the current manufacturing processes of prescription contact lenses. This allows your optometrist the ability to fit nearly any prescription you can imagine in materials that are approximately 10 times better than what we used only a few years ago! Today’s prescription contact lenses are available in aspheric designs to help you see more clearly and with UV blocking filters to help protect your eyes throughout the day.

If you think contact lenses may work for you, call your optometrist today to schedule a contact lenses fitting.

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

A Cutting Edge Treatment for Dry Eye – Scleral Contact Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses?

Meet my patient, a 58-year-old female who came to my office with terrible redness, burning, tearing eyes and sensitivity to light. She has used many treatments previously without success. I made the diagnosis of severe dry eye. The patient was fit with scleral lenses and was able to see better than 20/20 in each eye. In addition, she is able to wear the lenses all day long comfortably. Scleral lenses are large diameter gas permeable lenses that rest beyond the limits of the cornea on the sclera. They were first used in late 1800s and early 1900s however now the manufacturing process is more reproducible.

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

When do you need scleral lenses?

– primary and secondary corneal ectasias

– post-corneal transplants

– corneal scars

– corneal dystrophies or degenerations

– severe dry eyes

– graft versus host disease

– Sjogren’s syndrome

– Stevens-Johnson syndrome

– neurotrophic keratopathy

– chronic inflammatory conditions such as limbal stem cell deficiency or ocular cicatricial pemphigoid.

Clearance (the space between the cornea and scleral lens) is a key advantage to scleral lenses. The cornea is bathed all day long with saline, which rejuvenates the ocular surface. This is unlike other types of contact lenses (including soft and small diameter gas permeable lenses) that may compromise the ocular surface.Sleral lenses

Scleral lenses are a life-changing opportunity for many. In my practice, scleral lenses have helped people who previously have not been able to see or function with other types of contact lenses or glasses.

There have been numerous advancements in scleral lenses in the past year. Multifocal scleral lenses are now available allowing both distance and near vision are now available.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

Quick Tips for Sports Vision

To do well in sports, you need to have your eyes working at the top of their game. Here are a few quick tips to help you or your athlete perform better:

  • Make sure you have a proper prescription on, whether it is contact lenses or glasses. Having your vision dialed in correctly is the most important step to get your eyes working their best.
  • Be sure to protect your eyes! Polycarbonate or other protective plastic lenses can keep your eyes protected while you play as well as keeping dust or wind from getting in your eyes while you play the sports you love. This table can help you determine which types of eye protection are best for the sport you play. (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/eyewear.htm )

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

    Photo Courtesy of Morgan Burke on Flickr

  • Consider color filters for your field of play. Certain types of filters or tints can increase your contrast sensitivity and thereby increase your reaction times. Allaboutvision.com has an excellent table for different tints to help in different sports (http://www.allaboutvision.com/sportsvision/lens-tints-chart.htm ). Remember, the faster you can recognize that curve ball, the easier it will be to adjust your swing!

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

Anatomy of the Eye 101

Courtesy of DVIDSHUB on Flickr

Courtesy of DVIDSHUB on Flickr

As a teacher and a doctor, I talk about the eye on a daily basis to my optometry students and patients alike.  I often use examples that my optometry students and patients can relate to.  The eye is like a high definition video camera that captures images of the visual world in real time.  If any part of your eye, that is, your “human video camera,” is affected or broken you may experience varying degrees of blurry vision, discomfort, or other common symptoms.  If you seek professional evaluation by your optometrist at the first inkling that something is out of sync, he or she can “fix or repair” your eye and get you back on a healthy track.

So let’s talk about the eye from front to back.

To start, the eyelids and lashes are the first visible structures to the outside observer.  Not only are the eyelids and lashes beautiful, but they also serve to protect the eye.  The eyelids spread lubricating tears like that of a windshield wiper across the surface of the eye with just a single blink, and the lashes act like specialized antennae sensing the smallest incoming offending particles.

Next, the conjunctiva is known to us as the “white” part of the eye.  This too is visible to the outside observer.  There are times that the conjunctiva may get inflamed or infected which results in that unwanted “pink eye” or conjunctivitis.

Much respect and attention has been given to the 5-layer-thick cornea as the clear window of the eye.  This is the layer where contact lenses are applied to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.  Many successful surgeries like LASIK and corneal transplants have been performed on this tissue.

The anterior chamber and the vitreous are two compartments that give form to the eye and serve as conduits for circulating important fluids from one part of the eye to another.

Courtesy of entirelysubjective on Flickr

Courtesy of entirelysubjective on Flickr

The color part of the eye is called the iris.  It comes in many different colors and hues including brown, hazel, green, blue, and even violet.  The purpose of the iris is to regulate the amount of light that enters the eye.  Like that of a camera shutter, the iris controls the size of the pupil thus preventing under or over exposure of the picture of the visual world that is being seen.

The crystalline lens sits right behind the iris.  And similar to a camera lens, the human lens helps focus the things we see.

The retina, optic nerve, and macula can all be found way back in the eye.  The retina is the nervous tissue of the eye and is made up of 10 important layers. It gathers nervous signals and funnels it to the optic nerve.  As the name implies, the optic nerve is the nervous cable that connects the eye to the sight center in the back of the brain.  The macula allows you to see the finest details in vision.

This sums up the crash course on the Anatomy of the Eye 101.  Next time you are at your friendly optometrist’s office, just imagine the different parts of your eye being systematically looked at.

~By Judy Tong, OD

Makeup & Glasses

Glasses are becoming a popular trend, many wearing cat-style eye glasses or hipster rims. However, since it’s a fashion statement that covers up your eyes, many women think they can’t wear makeup when they wear their glasses, but it’s just the opposite, according to fashion website Refinery29.com. They suggest you wear warm and bright colors on your lids, because if you use cool colors you run the risk of just looking like you have a black eye.

Check out this video where Refinery29 eyeglass wearer, Taylor, shows you how she puts her makeup on to make her eye pop behind her stylish Warby Parkers.

makeupglasses