The vision problem affecting 1 in 5 school children

Chronic underfunding, overcrowded classrooms, run down schools, and shortage of textbooks and resources are some of the school issues that grab the headlines.

Yet, there’s a problem in our schools that affects an estimated 15-20% of our children and receives virtually no publicity. It’s a problem that is as acute in affluent communities as in the inner city.

The problem is our children’s vision. I’m saddened to report that there are millions of school-aged children in the U.S. who have vision problems that are interfering with their ability to learn. Unfortunately, the vast majority of them, their parents, and their teachers are unaware of the problem.

In too many cases, I have seen these undiagnosed vision problems create a cycle of despair. A child is labeled as a “slow learner,” receives special attention, yet shows little progress if the underlying vision problems are not treated.

Courtesy of MDGovpics on Flickr

Courtesy of MDGovpics on Flickr

In other less severe cases, I have seen problems linger as life-long “nuisances”- hindering the productivity and job satisfaction of successful executives, attorneys, actors, and other professionals.

How is it that so many of these problems can go undetected? There are three main reasons:

  1. Inadequate vision testing – The typical vision test given at schools (usually administered by the school nurse), and general eye doctors’ offices (that do not specialize in developmental vision) primarily only evaluate distance vision and eye health. Near vision tests, which determine if a child can read a book up-close, are often overlooked. More complex vision skills that are necessary to read effectively, such as eye tracking and teaming, are very rarely tested.
  2. Poor vision skills are “silent” ailments – A child cannot tell if he is seeing clearly because he cannot objectively compare his vision skills with others. By the same token, a parent or teacher cannot assess how a child is seeing because they cannot see through the child’s eyes.

No matter how poor a student’s vision skills, it is all that he or she has known. I have seen extreme cases where a child with double vision has never reported this to her parents because she thought everyone saw like this. Consequently, it is especially important that parents and teachers are aware of the behavioral signs that indicate a possible vision problem.

Signs of vision problems include:

  • School or sports performance below potential
  • Resistance to school work and homework
  • Slow reader or test taker
  • Clumsy catching a ball
  • Words go in and out of focus
  • Rubs eyes while reading
  • Covers an eye while reading
  • Uses finger to keep place reading after the 2nd grade
  • Moves reading material closer or further away to see it better
  • Short attention span on visual activities
  • Poor penmanship, doesn’t stay on the line
  1. Lack of public awareness-
    • The fact that proper vision is the learned mastery of variety of skills is not widely understood. Most people assume that visual skills naturally develop, when in fact, for approximately 20% of people these skills do not develop fully by themselves.
    • Fortunately, most people with these vision problems can be helped through a program of Vision training. A Vision training (VT) program builds and enhances deficient visual motor and perceptual skills step by step.

I am hoping that we will reach a time when poor vision skills are eliminated as a reason why many of our children are not performing to their potential in school and sports. This begins with one child at a time, and one developmental vision exam  at a time.

~Elise Brisco, OD

California Optometric Association

http://www.coavision.org

It’s just the FACTS: Vision & Learning Go Hand in Hand

August has been recognized as the Vision & Learning month.  It would seem appropriate since many children return to school in August or shortly thereafter.  In addition to getting new clothes and supplies for our kids, this yearly routine should spur us to take our children in for a comprehensive eye and vision examination.

Vision is a highly complex and intricate process.  So, it is not surprising that reading and learning is dependent on not only having excellent 20/20 vision, but also accurate eye movement, eye focusing, eye teaming, and visual motor skills.

It’s just the plain ole fact that there is a direct correlation between vision and learning.

Courtesy of woodleywonderworks on Flickr

Courtesy of woodleywonderworks on Flickr

Did you know that…

  • “25% of students in grades K-6 have visual problems that are serious enough to impede learning.” – American Public Health Association
  • Approximately “80% of children with a learning disability have an  undiagnosed vision problem.”– Vision Council of America
  • “1 in 4 children has an undiagnosed vision problem which can interfere with learning and lead to academic and/or behavioral problems.”  – College of Optometrists in Vision Development
  • Studies show that “children who had visual perceptual and eye movement difficulties did poorly on standardized tests.” – Dr. Lynn Hellerstein, FAAO, FCOVD, Past President of COVD
  • “When vision problems go undetected, children almost invariably have  trouble reading and doing their schoolwork.  They often a display fatigue, fidgeting and frustrations in the classroom – traits that can lead to a misdiagnosis of dyslexia or other learning disabilities.” – American Optometric Association
  • A “child with a vision based learning problem has excellent verbal skills, causing parent and educators to think the child must be lazy, have ADD/ADHD, or is learning disabled.”
    – College of Optometrists in Vision Development

A cursory vision screening is just not enough to detect vision-related learning difficulties.  Early prevention of a child’s vision problem is so important for school readiness, learning and academic success.  So make it an integral part of your child’s back-to-school preparations.  Buy school supplies, outfit your child with new clothes, and most important, take your child to see a doctor of optometry for a thorough eye and vision examination.

~Judy Tong, OD, FAAO

(Special thanks to my colleagues Drs. Carmen Barnhardt, Eric Borsting, Ray Chu, and Rebekah Louie.)