The SCARY… and fun truth about colored contact lenses

Colored contact lenses are a popular topic this time of year as many people prepare their Halloween costumes. How fun is it to have a cool accessory like tiger eyes, cat eyes or red or white eyes to complement the most creative of costume? Colored contacts are a great fun option.  There are also many people who like to wear colored contact lenses daily to make their eyes more blue, more green, more brown or a different color all together!

Courtesy of therefromhere on Flickr

Courtesy of therefromhere on Flickr

However, most people do not realize that even contacts worn for cosmetic purposes still pose a potential health risk for the eye if not properly fitted. This is true even if there is no prescription on the lens.  Contact lenses are classified as “medical devices” with the FDA.  Regardless of a corrective prescription, contacts are plastic on the surface of the eye and need to be fit properly and be taken care of properly to lessen the chance of vision threatening infections such as corneal ulcers.

Doctors of optometry perform additional tests above and beyond the glasses and eye health examinations when fitting contacts. We evaluate the size and shape of the cornea, the health of the tear layer and the fitting relationship between the cornea (the outer surface of the eye where the lens sits) and the contacts lens to insure the safest most appropriate lens for each individual patient.  We also educate patients on the best cleaning and wearing regimen for the them.  This greatly reduces any complications associated with contact lens use.

Buying contact lenses without a doctor’s prescription is something that happens with colored contacts often.  This practice leads to rise in vision threatening conditions that could be prevented with a proper contact lens examination. So, buy a different kind Halloween contact lens for each Halloween party this season, but get a prescription first!

~Lisa Weiss, OD, MEd, FCOVDCalifornia Optometric Association
http://www.coavision.org

Are contact lenses dangerous?

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

Courtesy of wader on Flickr

The Benefits

Contact lenses are medical devices that millions of people wear safely every single day. Many people enjoy the freedom from glasses that contact lenses allow.

Contact lenses are also great options for:

  • Sports
  • Changing eye color
  • People who have irregularities to the front of the eye, cornea, or are not able to see with glasses.

Contact lenses make it possible to see and function in everyday life.

The Dangers

Contact lenses can be dangerous if they are abused.

Contact lenses are medical devices and can only be prescribed and dispensed by a licensed eye doctor. If they are sold without being evaluated on the eye by a doctor it can lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Eye inflammation
  • Eye injuries

Proper care is key

Proper contact lens care and handling are important components of the contact lens fitting process. Contact lens solution used incorrectly or “topping off contact lens solution” (adding more without disposing of the current solution) can lead to multiple complications. It is important to use sterile contact lens solution and not tap water due to bacteria in water. Never, ever put contact lenses in your mouth or spit on them to try to clean them.

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

Courtesy of listentothemountains on Flickr

It is also important to replace contact lenses at the recommended frequency. For example, daily disposable contact lenses should be replaced each day. Contact lenses that are overused and abused can lead to serious problems.

Certain contact lenses are approved for sleeping or extended wear. However, if your contact lenses are not approved for extended wear, this can lead to complications on the cornea, or front of the eye.

If you are interested in contact lenses, schedule an appointment with a doctor of optometry today.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO

Should I get contact lenses? Quick guide to help you decide!

Prescription contact lenses can provide the freedom and comfort to perform a number of activities that cannot be achieved in glasses.

  • The most common example is sports. For those instances where you know you will be running or jumping for extended amount of time and hopefully breaking a sweat at the same time, contact lenses are an ideal choice for vision correction. No need to worry about your frames slipping off your nose or blocking your peripheral vision. Contacts can provide you with crisp and clear vision throughout your entire visual field so you can focus on being your best.
Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

Courtesy of nikozz on Flickr

  • Another great example is for social events or gatherings where you know there will be cameras everywhere. This can range from brides-to-be prepping for their big day to just spending a night out with friends. When you know you want to look your best in the photos commemorating important times in the lives of your family and friends, contact lenses are the best accessory you could ask for!
  • Similarly, prescription color contact lenses can give you that extra pizzazz when you want to be a little different. Whether you are just adding a little blue or green to match your outfit or a purple or gray tint to draw some extra attention to your face, prescription color contacts can be a great choice to help you stand out in a crowd.
  • I personally choose to wear my prescription contact lenses on days when it is raining or cold. That way I can avoid having rain drops on my glasses or having my lenses fog up for 30 seconds or more when I go indoors in the winter time.
Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

  • The best thing about contact lenses is the new technology used in the current manufacturing processes of prescription contact lenses. This allows your optometrist the ability to fit nearly any prescription you can imagine in materials that are approximately 10 times better than what we used only a few years ago! Today’s prescription contact lenses are available in aspheric designs to help you see more clearly and with UV blocking filters to help protect your eyes throughout the day.

If you think contact lenses may work for you, call your optometrist today to schedule a contact lenses fitting.

~Ranjeet S. Bajwa, OD

A Cutting Edge Treatment for Dry Eye – Scleral Contact Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses?

Meet my patient, a 58-year-old female who came to my office with terrible redness, burning, tearing eyes and sensitivity to light. She has used many treatments previously without success. I made the diagnosis of severe dry eye. The patient was fit with scleral lenses and was able to see better than 20/20 in each eye. In addition, she is able to wear the lenses all day long comfortably. Scleral lenses are large diameter gas permeable lenses that rest beyond the limits of the cornea on the sclera. They were first used in late 1800s and early 1900s however now the manufacturing process is more reproducible.

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

Courtesy of maikel_nai on Flickr

When do you need scleral lenses?

– primary and secondary corneal ectasias

– post-corneal transplants

– corneal scars

– corneal dystrophies or degenerations

– severe dry eyes

– graft versus host disease

– Sjogren’s syndrome

– Stevens-Johnson syndrome

– neurotrophic keratopathy

– chronic inflammatory conditions such as limbal stem cell deficiency or ocular cicatricial pemphigoid.

Clearance (the space between the cornea and scleral lens) is a key advantage to scleral lenses. The cornea is bathed all day long with saline, which rejuvenates the ocular surface. This is unlike other types of contact lenses (including soft and small diameter gas permeable lenses) that may compromise the ocular surface.Sleral lenses

Scleral lenses are a life-changing opportunity for many. In my practice, scleral lenses have helped people who previously have not been able to see or function with other types of contact lenses or glasses.

There have been numerous advancements in scleral lenses in the past year. Multifocal scleral lenses are now available allowing both distance and near vision are now available.

~Melissa Barnett, OD, FAAO